What’s in a pass – Revisited

Back in January this blog took a look at the passing of Blackpool and the role that it plays in their overall game plan. Then Blackpool were on 25 points and 8 games later they have only mustered up further 4 points. This decline is on the radars of the mainstream media and the following clichés are being warmed up; ‘the honeymoon is over’ and ‘running out of steam’. However, can a focus on Blackpool’s passing help to understand more about why Blackpool have only clocked up 4 points from a possible 21 in their last 8 games?

The decline?

Just for clarity purposes, here is a chart showing how Blackpool’s points per game has progressed throughout the season and as you can see the line tails off towards the end as the most recent run of defeats have taken their toll.

Blackpool's average points since the match against Arsenal in week 2.

Pass Incompletion

In the previous article Blackpool’s passing was picked out as a key strength and at that time they had a pass completion rate higher than Liverpool under Roy Hodgson. However, if we plot the game pass completion rates for each game on a graph, what do we see?

From left to right see how the line gradually tails downwards as Blackpool have completed less and less passes.

As you can see Blackpool’s pass completion has been gradually eroding in recent weeks. In fact for the games prior to their last win Blackpool’s pass completion was 75% and in the last six games it has dropped to 70%.

Player Focus

Recent articles have focused on some individual player performance over the course of the season, most recently with Ian Evatt, Charlie Adam and David Vaughan. Below is a chart showing their pass completion % for the last 6 games set against that of the games before that.

You can see above how Charlie Adam and Ian Evatt's pass completion has dropped in the last 6 games.

You can clearly see that in the games where Blackpool’s pass completion has begun to disintegrate, David Vaughan has been consistently excellent, even pushing up his pass completion above 85%. Whilst Adam has dropped from 71% to 60% and Evatt has gone from 68% to 75%.

This tends to fit in to the fact that Blackpool’s pass completion has started to drop for two key reasons. Team putting players under more pressure by closing them down and that Blackpool’s players are still learning to improve their decision-making at this level i.e. when to pass and what pass to make.

For example, teams seem to really pressure the back line and the keeper now, in order to make it harder for them to play out from the back. This is further backed up when looking at the completion rate for goal kicks. In the last six games it has dropped to 57% from 64% previously. Earlier on in the season goal kicks were often taken short, however, forwards are alert to that threat now and seek to cover the edge of the area making interceptions and forcing passing errors. See the chalkboard below from Blackpool’s most recent game against Aston Villa. Notice how 9 of the 20 interceptions made by Villa were in Blackpool’s own half.

As Villa pressed Blackpool they made 20 interceptions, 9 of them in the Blackpool half.

Pep talk

This week Ian Holloway has talked about how he wants to learn from Josep Guardiola to improve his side. It is possible that he feels he can learn to improve his side’s ball retention by seeing how Barcelona play and that this learning could well be applied to allow his side to pass the ball better under pressure, improving their pass completion and possibly win more games. On average, in the games that Blackpool win, their pass completion is 1% higher than those they lose. Small margins on the surface, but at the top-level of football, small margins might make a big difference especially as Blackpool try to stay in the Premier League.

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About tangerinedreaming

I support Blackpool FC and I want to share my thoughts on the way our team plays. This blog is wholly inspired by Zonal Marking which has opened my eyes to football like never before. So if you read this, thanks for taking some time out to see what I think and if you feel bound to comment then please do so, but be kind and constructive with any criticism.
This entry was posted in Blackpool, Blackpool FC, Charlie Adam, Ian Evatt, Ian Holloway, Pass Completion, Players and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to What’s in a pass – Revisited

  1. Pingback: Tweets that mention What’s in a pass – Revisited | Tangerine Dreaming -- Topsy.com

  2. Great article, and picks out a lot of key points pretty effortlessly.

    It really highlights Vaughan’s consistency, and while I wouldn’t argue he’s a better player than Adam, you know you can always rely on him to keep the side ticking over.

    In my Everton article I posted about Rachubka’s distribution, but Kingson too has been opting to go long more often. Part of it is down to pressing sure, but I wonder whether some of it is also a conscious decision? If so, it seems strange when playing out from the back had been so effective.

    Great stuff though, really enjoyed this article.

  3. Pingback: Blackpool 1-3 Arsenal: Arsenal continually exploit Blackpool’s high defensive line | Zonal Marking

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